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Welcome to the blog for Sober Executive Living. We understand that as an entrepreneur, professional or executive, you face some unique challenges; the path of recovery can be a difficult one for all of us and when we have a community that we can relate to, the support and affinity that one can embrace is invaluable.

It is our hope that here on the pages of Sober Executive Living and within the Executive Blog you will find information, inspiration and guidance to help you along your own path to wellness and balance.

Keep coming back and please, do share your own experience and insight.

Be well-

The Blog Staff at Executive Sober Living

Ask an Expert: What Does ‘Recovered’ Mean? Am I ‘Recovered’?

Drug Rehab Addiction Treatment Alcoholism Center | New Method Wellness

Ask an Expert: What Does ‘Recovered’ Mean? Am I ‘Recovered’?

By The Fix staff

06/23/14

What does the word recovered mean? I thought I was still recovering after doing rehab but wonder what the benchmark is for simply being recovered? – Tess

Lance Dodes: Many words in the addiction field have been tossed around for years without being clearly defined or even being meaningful. “Recovered,” “recovery” and “being in recovery” are examples. In most of life, “being in recovery” means a person is making progress even though s/he isn’t “cured.” Sometimes it is used as a synonym for “being in remission” – indicating relapse is a clear possibility (as with being “in recovery” from cancer). Other times it means “on the path to a definite cure” – as in being in recovery after surgery. Neither of these usages is problematic, so long as we all understand what is meant. But in the addiction field, the term has been used in a third way in 12-step programs.

There, it is traditional for people to refer to themselves as “in recovery,” no matter how long they have been abstinent from their addictive behavior and no matter how well they are doing in life. Partly, this is the same as saying they are “in remission,” based on the idea they can always suffer a relapse. But too often, being “in recovery” has come to mean something different: that they are on what they declare is the right path. When used this way, folks are condemned as not “in recovery” if they drop out of 12-step programs or are thought to not be “working the program” adequately. When “recovery” is used this way, it is more a political statement than a factual or medical …read more

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One in 10 Deaths Due to Excessive Drinking

A group of girls drinking. Lineker's Bar, Playa de las Américas. Tenerife, Canary Islands. 2007

Drug Rehab Addiction Treatment Alcoholism Center | New Method Wellness

One in 10 Deaths Due to Excessive Drinking

The CDC says it’s probably best to pass on another round

TIME Magazine

  • Alexandra Sifferlin @acsifferlin

June 30, 2014

Excessive drinking accounts for one in 10 deaths among adults between ages 20-64 years, according to a recent study.

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed data on alcohol-related deaths from 2006 to 2010 and found drinking too much is one of the leading causes of preventative death.

Death from alcohol abuse can happen in a variety of ways. Excessive drinking (4 or more drinks on an occasion for women, 5 or more drinks on an occasion for men) can threaten people’s health in the short term, such as by drunk driving or alcohol poisoning, but can also lead to long-term health consequences like heart disease, breast cancer and liver disease.

Excessive drinking led to 88,000 deaths per year from 2006-2010 and shortened the lives of those who died by 30 years. That equates to about 2.5 million years of potential life lost to drinking. Premature deaths due to excessive drinking costs the U.S. about $224 billion a year, or $1.90 a drink, the researchers report in the study publishedin Preventing Chronic Disease.

About 70% of alcohol-related deaths occurred among men. Discrepancies were also noticed state to state, with New Mexico having the highest rate of death from excessive drinking, and New Jersey the lowest.

“Excessive alcohol use is a leading cause of preventable death that kills many Americans in the prime of their lives,” said Ursula E. Bauer, director of CDC’s National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in a …read more

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Proposed Bill Would Allow Doctors to Help More Addicts

Edward Markey

Drug Rehab Addiction Treatment Alcoholism Center | New Method Wellness

Proposed Bill Would Allow Doctors to Help More Addicts

The Democratic TREAT Act would increase the number of addicted patients doctors could see while providing opioid medications like Suboxone.

The FIX by Paul Gaita

08/07/14

Democratic lawmakers from across the nation are sponsoring a bill that will allow health care providers to treat more patients addicted to heroin and other opioids.

The Recovery Enhancement for Addiction Treatment Act, proposed by Senator Edward Markey (D-Mass) and co-sponsored by Senators Diane Feinstein (D-Calif), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), John D. Rockefeller (D-W.V.) and Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii), will increase the number of addicted patients that doctors can see in a single year. It will also provide them with medication-assisted therapy like buprenorphine, sometimes known as Suboxone.

Current federal law restricts physicians and other providers from treating more than 30 patients in the first year and 100 in subsequent years, and requires a waiver to prescribe medication. Under the TREAT Act, physicians could see 100 addicted patients during the first year and an unlimited amount in the years that followed.

The bill would also allow nurse practitioners and physician assistants to treat patients with buprenorphine and other opioid addiction medications, if they first complete addiction treatment training and are in a state that allows them to prescribe controlled substances.

In a statement, Markey said, “Treatment for opioid addiction should not be harder to access than the actual heroin and prescription drugs destroying our communities. The TREAT Act will expand access to medical treatment that works, allowing doctors and trained nurse practitioners to treat more patients and address this scourge of addiction.”

The bill, however, is not without its critics. Though buprenorphine is a Schedule III narcotic and is considered a …read more

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Study Finds ‘Energy Cocktails’ Increase Urge To Drink

energy drink alcohol_0

Drug Rehab Addiction Treatment Alcoholism Center | New Method Wellness

Study Finds ‘Energy Cocktails’ Increase Urge To Drink

An Australian study has raised another flag in the dangerous practice of combing booze and energy drinks.

By McCarton Ackerman

07/22/14

A new study from Australia confirms that combining energy drinks with alcohol gives people a greater urge to keep on drinking and ultimately increases binge alcohol use. The findings were published in the latest edition of the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Australian researchers analyzed 75 participants between the ages of 18-30, half of whom were given a vodka-Red Bull concoction and the other half given a vodka with soda water. The drinkers also completed an Alcohol Urge Questionnaire both before and 20 minutes after their time in the lab party, as well as a Biphasic Alcohol Effects Questionnaire, Drug Effects Questionnaire, and breath alcohol concentration (BAC) test.

Their responses showed that those given the energy cocktails had a greater urge to drink. “A greater urge to drink has substantial implications when we think about the nature of drinking episodes,” saidPeter G. Miller, associate professor of psychology at Deakin University, Geelong Waterfront Campus in Australia. “The drunker you get, the more likely you are to get injured, be a victim or perpetrator of an assault, or even drive home while drunk, let alone making bad choices about the people you associate with and possible sexual behavior.”

The findings from the study are in line with several cross-sectional studies from the U.S., which also showed that young adults who consume energy cocktails drink more alcohol than those who do not. Rebecca McKetin, lead researcher and a fellow at the Australian National University’s Centre for Research on Aging, Health and Well-Being, believes the results dispel the notion that …read more

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New Study Identifies Triggers In Cocaine Relapse

snorting coke_0

Drug Rehab Addiction Treatment Alcoholism Center | New Method Wellness

New Study Identifies Triggers In Cocaine Relapse

A connection between endogenous amino acids and opioid receptors may offer a clue as to why people relapse.

By John Lavitt

07/25/14

A study published in the advanced online edition of the journal Neuropsychopharmacology on June 19 has identified organic amino acids in the form of peptide chains that are directly involved in initiating a cocaine relapse.

Authored by a team led by Rafael Maldonado, director of the Neuropharmacology Laboratory at Pompeu Fabra University’s Department of Experimental and Health Sciences in Barcelona, Spain, the researchers have highlighted the role of specific components of the brain’s opioid system in cocaine relapse.

Although cocaine is not an opioid per se, the way the drug affects the brain is controlled by the brain’s opioid system. This system directly affects the brain’s reward circuits that play an essential role in addictive processes. The continued use of cocaine results in the alterations in the expression of some of the system’s components. As the endogenous opioid peptides and receptors are affected by the addiction, the direct result can be a greater likelihood of an addict relapsing on cocaine.

“Our study has demonstrated that endogenous peptides that act on mu and delta opioid receptors play a role in cocaine relapse,” Maldonadosaid. “However, our research also suggests that the opioid peptides derived from the precursor protein prodynorphin seem to play the opposite role of that of the identified peptides.”

As opposed to human testing, researchers employed a mouse model of cocaine relapse implemented at the Neuropharmacology Laboratory. By the genetic deletion of endogenous peptides and their interaction with the brain’s opioid system, the researchers were able to remove the desire of the mice to use cocaine once …read more

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Can an AA Critic and a 12-Step Advocate Get Along?

fudd

Drug Rehab Addiction Treatment Alcoholism Center | New Method Wellness

Can an AA Critic and a 12-Step Advocate Get Along?

AA critic Juliet Abram chats with author and spoken-word artist Bucky Sinister about why he’s so pro-12-steps.

By Juliet Abram

07/21/14

Can a non-stepper and 12-stepper hold a constructive interview? I was determined to find out, so I contacted Bucky Sinister, author, poet, spoken word artist, comedian and avid 12-stepper.

Three years ago, I took a copy of Bucky Sinister’sGet Up: A 12-Step Recovery Guide for Freaks, Misfits and Weirdos with me to residential treatment. The title jumped out at me from the bottom shelf of the self-help for addiction section at Border’s back in 2010. It was basically a 12-step guide for atheists, so I felt less alone in a faith-based rehab by carrying that book around.

Sinister addresses The God Problem in 2008′s Get Up, a deconstruction of the 12 steps. Advising against arguing about atheism with more religious members, he suggests substituting God with the baby Odin, if you must. I tried this and it worked, only I conjured up unicorns instead, and, like magic, others stopped questioning my faith.

If you grew up listening to Black Flag, Motorhead, Nirvana or Jay-Z, then Bucky Sinister’s voice comes across as one of your friends; not one of your great grandfather’s friends from 1939. For example, in 2011′s Still Standing: Addicts Talk About Living Sober, he mentions the Fuck-Its: “Recovery is hard. Fuck it. Not drinking is hard. Fuck it. The fourth step is unreal. Fuck it.” Little things sometimes mess with our self-control, but it’s not impossible to change.

So why would I, an outspoken anti-12-step writer, want to chat with a vocal 12-step advocate like Sinister? …read more

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Approaches You Don’t Know About for Helping Someone With Substance Abuse

Drug Rehab Addiction Treatment Alcoholism Center | New Method Wellness

Approaches You Don’t Know About for Helping Someone With Substance Abuse

Nicole Kosanke, Ph.D.

Director of Family Services, Center for Motivation and Change

If you are a family member of someone with a substance problem, you have probably heard suggestions that include distancing yourself, using tough love or detaching until your loved one bottoms out and decides to change. You can turn on the TV and hear about interventions and celebrity rehab stays. What you probably have not heard is that families can be tremendously helpful, can influence change in their loved one, and can influence positive change in themselves. There are strategies for helping that have been proven in studies to be very effective but have been very poorly disseminated into the public and into the professional treatment world… but they exist!

Family members who are worried about a loved one’s substance use understandably feel everything from annoyance to terror and desperation. And there’s a huge range in what might provoke worry: maybe there’s concern about a wife’s increased drinking after the kids went to college; maybe a friend is looking more disheveled and could be using pills; maybe an adult son doesn’t return calls anymore and smokes a lot of pot; maybe a brother is back in treatment, again, for methamphetamine abuse.

As a psychologist working in the field of substance abuse treatment, I am in direct contact with families every day with a full range of serious problems. I know that substance abuse problems vary in terms of severity, fright and heartbreak, and yet I am optimistic! Not because I’m naïve or think these problems are no big deal, but because I know change is possible. In …read more

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Psychology Today: Recognize Suffering in Others

Rick-Hanson

Drug Rehab Addiction Treatment Alcoholism Center | New Method Wellness

Recognize Suffering in Others

Rick Hanson, PhD

Where Does It Hurt?

The Practice:
Recognize suffering in others.
Why?

We’re usually aware of our own suffering, which—broadly defined—includes the whole range of physical and mental discomfort, from mild headache or anxiety to the agony of bone cancer or the anguish of losing a child. (Certainly, there is more to life than suffering, including great joy and fulfillment; that said, we’ll sustain a single focus here.)

But seeing the suffering in others: that’s not so common. All the news and pictures of disaster, murder, and grief that bombard us each day can ironically numb us to suffering in our own country and across the planet. Close to home, it’s easy to tune out or simply miss the stress and strain, unease and anger, in the people we work, live—even sleep—with.

This creates problems for others, of course. Often what matters most to another person is that someone bears witness to his or her suffering, that someone just really gets it; it’s a wound and a sorrow when this doesn’t happen. And at the practical level, if their suffering goes unnoticed, they’re unlikely to get help.

Plus not seeing suffering harms you as well. You miss information about the nature of life, miss chances to have your heart opened, miss learning what your impact on others might be. Small issues that could have been resolved early on grow until they blow up. People don’t like having their pain overlooked, so they’re more likely to over-react, or be uncharitable toward you when you’re the one having a hard time. Wars and troubles …read more

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Video: A Parent’s Perspective

Drug Rehab Addiction Treatment Alcoholism Center | New Method Wellness

Video: A Parent’s Perspective
from the Center for Motivation and Change and the Partnership at Drugfree.org

click the image below to play the video

The post Video: A Parent’s Perspective appeared first on New Method Wellness: Addiction Treatment and Recovery Help.

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Social media can influence teens with pro-drug messages

Drug Rehab Addiction Treatment Alcoholism Center | New Method Wellness

A new NIDA-funded study analyzed the content and demographic reach of a popular pro-marijuana Twitter handle in 2013 and found that only ten percent of the messages mentioned any risky behaviors associated with marijuana use.
Given that over 70 percent of followers were 19 years of age or…

The post Social media can influence teens with pro-drug messages appeared first on New Method Wellness: Addiction Treatment and Recovery Help.

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